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20121225
20121225
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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
a look at politics and the year in foreign policy. we want to hear from you about your political hero. why he or she deserves the honor? your political hero of 2012. you can give us a call this morning. host: you can reach out on social media. you can send us a tweet at twitter.com/cspanwj. we have about 15 comment so far. you can send this e-mail that journal@c-span.org. your political hero for the first 45 minutes. here are some thoughts on facebook and twitter. this is from jonathan espinoza. about 15 comments on facebook already. danny likes bernie sanders. host: just some of the mansion's this morning. entions some of the mansi this morning. you can give us a call. 202-585-3881 for republicans. 202-585-3880 for democrats. 202-585-3882 for independents. also on facebook, facebook.com/cspan. a couple of stories related to the fiscal cliff. from "thew bid frittle bit washington times." this is ron from louisiana. caller: good morning. host: who wish to nominate? -- who would you'll nominate? caller: obama. host: what makes him your hero? caller: we were on a major slide when he came
will play a strong role at shaping foreign policy. she also named yun as her spokesperson. yun is vice president of the newspaper and television association. he studied at tokyo's ko university. park is said to set up her administration this week. >>> russian president vladimir putin spends christmas eve in india, and he sees the chance to sign billions of dollars worth in trade and defense deals. putin met indian prime minister singh in new delhi. they agreed on a deal for india to purchase components of fighter jets to assemble. they also agreed to set up a $2 billion fund to set up joint trade and economic projects. they decided to add two nuclear reactors to southern india. but they reportedly failed to agree on terms of compensation in the event of an accident. >>> wrestling fans turned out >>> some people will line up for the smell of baked goods. developers are offering them a machine that can replicate the handy work. >> reporter: japanese consumers loved stuffed bred especially sweet read bean buns. this factory churns out 1300 buns day. breds like these are usually made by ha
, is a frequent guest on "morning joe" to discuss foreign policies and world affairs. but this spring she came to us with her own memoir. "prague winter: a personal story of remembrance and war from 1937 to 1948." in it, she tells of prague in one of its darkest chapters, the breakout of world war ii, when at just 2 years old, she was forced to flee czechoslovakia with her family. hearse is an immigrant story like so many others, including my mother's and fathers. whose birthday, my father's, will never forget. you've got a really good memory. she's the author of the new memoir of "prague winter: a personal story of remembrance and war from 1937 to 1948." this book is amazing. >> and speaking of the brzezinskis, you know, it's amazing how much dr. brzezinski's life was shaped by the fact that they fled warsaw right before the uprising and mrs. brzezinski, of course, had to flee czechoslovakia, just like you. and you actually talked about in a debate that rose up about colin powell and his view of the world, polilus -- versus your v of the world, how your view was shaped by your childhood. >> t
foreign policy. she also named yun as her spokesperson. yun is vice president of the newspaper and television association. he studied at tokyo's ko university. puck is said to set up her administration this week. >>> russian president vladimir putin spends christmas eve in india, and he sees the chance to sign billions of dollars worth in trade and defense deals. putin met indian prime minister singh in new delhi. they agreed on a deal for india to purchase components of fighter jets to assemble. they also agreed to set up a $2 billion fund to set up joint trade and economic projects. they decided to add two nuclear reactors to southern india. but they reportedly failed to agree on terms of compensation in the event of an accident. >>> wrestling fans turned out for events in pakistan earlier this month that pitted some of japan's strongest men against each other. professional wrestling used to be popular in pakistan and thousands showed up for the exhibition matches. behind the scenes is a long history between a japanese wrestling giant and a legendary local family. verk has th
these jobs, foreign policy is my passion, and yet actually i'm also a mother and i want to be at home for the last five years that my children are at home and it was hard for me to admit that to myself but in the end i had to recognize both as a matter of need and want that my life was going to go in a different direction than i had always expected it would, and i had to listen to that and i had to in the end kind of say, wow, maybe i'm not quite the same person i thought i was, but i know this is the right thing for me to do. >> what was the most difficult part of your job in relation to balancing it with your role as a mother? >> it was just that sense so often where, you know, particularly my oldest son really needed me home, needed us both there, and i was in another place, and i could not do anything about that. you know, i think that is true for millions of parents and certainly millions of women, and i realized the stress was just overwhelming of knowing that i had a child who really did need me and i couldn't respond. i couldn't live up to that responsibility. >> after you cam
to get into foreign policy. one of the first things he does is he reaches out to one of the senator fulbrights. he gets a call from senator byrd's office. they ask him to come in interview. he is stunned. he does not think senator byrd cares about foreign policy. senator byrd convinces him he wants to be involved in foreign policy. as the book unfolds and as i learned about it, it is amazing to see how strong he is on foreign policy almost from the beginning. he plays this phenomenally important role. in the panama canal treaties. it is not just who has the votes, but he understands the substance better than anyone else. they all went down to panama, but he leads one of the first trips. he goes down there and he learns the panama issues. he brought the same dedication to every issue. one thing i say in the book is he knew that just being leader did not make you a great senator automatically. whoever heard of scott lucas and william nolan, senate majority leaders before lyndon johnson. you never heard of them because they did not do anything. robert byrd brought that extra dimension
religion and politics. in 45 minutes, it looked at the biggest foreign policy events of 2012.
republican president of the united states. the league well within the mainstream of american foreign policy. the senate has to ratify it. it and 80 of them have said that they want the united states to ratify the treaty and join the league of nations under some conditions. 80 is well more than enough to make ratifications. >> they need two-thirds. >> 64 or -- ratification is not hard in the scenario. you have 80. you need 64 or 65. okay. the deal baker. they shouldn't be deal breaker. very few people view them as deal breaker. he knows wilson. and lodge says wilson, you know, he might accept reservation on the principle. we can get the ratification easily if you accept it. and wilson says i will never except the reservations. lodge at the reds elevation of the treaty. lodge is the republican. >> from the other party. >> that's right he's the republican the leader of the republican party in the senate. the most influential voice. >> the partisan break down. >> it's pretty closely split. there's a democratic i believe there's a democratic majority at this point. the key is 50eu6. it you canno
several nonfiction titles included in foreign policy magazine must read books. >> booktv is here at the annual national press club authors night and joining us now is author r. renshaw agree who has written a book called first cameraman. what is with the obama administration. >> is a videographer, sent in a carriage for a few years in the white house. the lifecycle did not work on the campaign formally or the white house power to the new and strange world of super pacs and independent expenditures. spectaculars about the campaign into destiny. as you get hooked up in a president? >> it is the right place, right time. a friend of mine was working at cnn as a documentary producer and has a more normal path into politics. i was not the first on anyone's list. she would knew i wanted to get involved in broadband and then i just hit it off with the senator and started traveling inside the bubble. >> how long did you do it? was a 24/7 for a while? >> you know, especially on the campaign, it really felt like 20 for seven. i was practically living in chicago when i was there too were thr
a half of his face because he's brilliant domestically, troubled on foreign policy. but he had a good side image so i think you could have half of him. >> can you do that? >> they can do do anything they want. >> she's the one -- >> half a face. >> so we've already talked about fdr. we've talked about truman. let's talk about reagan, a guy who when many people on the left thought he stumbled into office as an accident of history, few could expect this guy to be as transformative as he was. i would guess most historians 100 years from now will talk about the 20th century, they'll talk about fdr and reagan. >> well, there's no question. having created -- i mean, fdr creating a generation of liberal followers and reagan creating a generation of conservative followers, changing the whole idea of what we thought about government, whether one agrees or not, dealing with the cold war, being able to finally bring about that partnership with gorbachev, you know, take that wall down, the strength he showed, the communication ability, the fact that people felt optimistic during his time, the fac
god bless you and god bless america. [applause] >> tomorrow morning a look at foreign policy in 2012. then the biggest political stories of 2012 with fox news political analyst juan williams. washington juren live every day at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> the senate runches for legislative business on thursday and the house has a proform asession scheduled that day. the first would extend provisions of the fisa act. the other is a pack abbling for areas affected by hurricane sandy. you can follow live coverage of the senate on c-span2. and house members are on stand by as negotiations continue over the so-called fiscal cliff. >> now a conversation on hollywood's portrayal of politics and policy making in movies and tv shows. among those we'll hear from the crete or the of the show "homeland." this is an hour 20 minutes. >> good evening again. welcome back to the forum. i'm not the one you'll be applauding for. you know we have public events, public forums in our headquarters campus about once a month. and we've had former presidents and foreign ministers and ambassadors an
world and the tendency of american foreign policy at the time to think that you could fix and watch with a hammer. yeah, so we did. we went on the road and in many ways had our faith in the american process and our country restored by meeting some wonderful, committed people, who really mean extremely well and have the future of this country in their hearts and minds. but we raised the better part of $10 million, and it ain't right, you know? i do not know a lot about election reform, but it seems it breaks into two areas. one is the campaign and the other is the actual election itself. fixing the campaign is going to be tough, trying to get the money out of it, trying to get some forms in the place of our debates that actually give us a clear idea of who the candidate is and what they intend for the country -- that is a difficult and tall order. trying to streamline it so that it does not take two years to run for public office. these are difficult things to accomplish, and i do not know how we go about it. it seems as though there is a sign of election reform, the process itself,
at the biggest foreign policy events of the year. >> i was handing out leaflets for robert kennedy. i broke with the democratic party and went to work for john lindsay. i went down to the liberal party. i was handing out leaflets on a street corner in new york. and a woman thought it was acucute. she asked me why and i made an early case for lindsey and i made the case against his opponent. she handed me a box of pastry. i took a back to headquarters. there were all these doughnuts and a lot of $10 bills. one of my early lessons in politics and i was told you can keep the money. >> david axelrod on his life in journalism and politics. fall by the all women delegation of new hampshire. then growing up in the white house. tonight on c-span. >> there was a forum on women in leadership. hilda solis spoke about her career and serving in the obama administration. >> good morning. they come from los angeles and cleveland and baltimore. poor and white. each of them have one thing in common. they are all successful. each rose to the top of their field in the arts or politics or sports. we will talk
country as great as it is. that foreign policy record we have is something to be proud of. that is not to say we should be putting boots on the ground or putting our men and women in harm's way but i think we do have an opportunity, or at least, you know, a chance to start to comprise some policies that could help steer syria out of this and also we obviously need to be worrying about iran, its nuclear program and its meddling in the politics and policies of some of our allies in the region. jamie: i'm not exaggerating, but sometimes i lock my door at night i think about iran. it is so scary. if people don't follow it they should. we're a little stretched now in the united states. we have boots on the ground and we have a lot of other things. it is very difficult to get intel on iran. they are surely fueling syria and all the violence that's going on there. even russia has been a bit hands off. what could we do? >> well, you know, first of all, iran's fingerprints are all over syria. i think that is undeniable. they continue to help the syrians crack down on this insurrect
public relations to become the policy chief. cabinet ministers are falling into place. he selected longtime ally fumio kishida as foreign minister. he served as minister in charge of okinawa and the northern territories. analysts say that he chose him for his experience. the new foreign minister will have to deal with the relocation of the futenma air station in okinawa. abe is pressuring the bank of japan again to swiftly join his government and put an end to deflation. he says it's only natural for the government to get involved in shaping monetary policy noting that conventional steps have failed to pull japan out of the drawn-out price downturn. abe made his call with officials of the japan business federation or keidanren on tuesday. >> translator: soon after we form a new cabinet tomorrow, i hope the government can establish a policy accord with the bank of japan to set an inflation target of 2%. the bank should be held accountable to meeting the target. >> last week boj policymakers decided to decide whether to set the 2% target in january. the bank's current goal is 1%. mea
were included in "foreign policy" magazine's must read books.
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)